Kids aren't buying what we are selling: a quantitative analysis of student dropout and school supports for dropout prevention

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Kids aren't buying what we are selling: a quantitative analysis of student dropout and school supports for dropout prevention

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14488

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Title: Kids aren't buying what we are selling: a quantitative analysis of student dropout and school supports for dropout prevention
Author: Freers, Renee Carnahan
Date: 2012-06-01
Publisher: University of Missouri--Kansas City
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the number of administrators and counselors in schools and the graduation rates in those schools. Administrators and counselors work closely with students and have the unique opportunity to design and sustain support systems that can prevent dropouts. The overarching investigative question in this study was: whether there is a significantly higher graduation rate in Missouri public high schools with 500 or more students where there is also a higher ratio of administrators or counselors per students. The sub-questions that were investigated are: (a) Do Missouri public high schools with 500 or more students that have higher percentages (>15%) of students of color demonstrate significantly lower graduation rates than schools with higher percentages of White students? (b) Do Missouri public high schools with 500 or more students, that have higher percentages (>25%) of students eligible for free or reduced price lunch demonstrate significantly lower graduation rates than schools with higher percentages of students from higher socio-economic backgrounds? (c) Is there is a positive correlation between student attendance rates and the graduation rates in high schools with 500 or more students in the state of Missouri? The results of this study found there is not a higher graduation rate in schools that have a higher administrator/counselor ratio per student, schools with more than 15% of their student population being students of color have significantly lower graduation rates, schools with higher than 25% of their students eligible for free and reduced lunch have significantly lower graduation rates and there is a positive correlation between student attendance rates and the graduation rate in high schools with 500 or more students in the state of Missouri. Findings from this dissertation will be used to guide public school district and building level leaders as they continue to pursue the goal of increasing graduation rates.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14488

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