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dc.contributor.advisorKremer, R. J. (Robert J.)eng
dc.contributor.advisorGoyne, Keith Williameng
dc.contributor.authorHoilett, Nigeleng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 4, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisors: Dr. Robert Kremer, Dr. Keith W. Goyneeng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Soil, environmental, and atmospheric sciences.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractGreenhouse gas emissions (GHG) vary with the interactions among physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of soil and microclimate. Soil microorganisms are involved in almost all soil processes, and are also involved in GHG dynamics between the soil and atmosphere. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between GHG efflux and soil microbial community and activity across a forested landscape. Soil samples were incubated at different temperature and moisture over a 30 days period. Microbial activity and diversity were assessed using enzyme activity, phospholipid lipid fatty acid profiles (PLFA), and soil microbial diversity, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real-time PCR analysis. Our research revealed temporal differences in microbial population and GHG efflux, indicating that time of year when samples were collected is an important factor. Temperature and moisture significantly affected soil microbial population and GHG efflux. In addition, correlation between GHG and measured biological properties and GHG and soil temperature and moisture in the incubated soils implied that microbial properties as well as soil temperature and moisture may affect GHG efflux from these forest soils. However, the low correlation coefficient (r values) and the lack of correlation within some sampling periods indicated that the relationship among soil microorganisms, soil conditions and GHG efflux is highly complex and cannot be fully explained by direct correlations among the measured properties and GHG efflux.eng
dc.format.extentxv, 168 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872560838eng
dc.identifier.otherHoilettN-121911-D121eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14496eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2011 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertationseng
dc.subjectgreenhouse gaseseng
dc.subjectsoil microorganismseng
dc.subjectphospholipid fatty acideng
dc.subjectdenaturing gradient gel electrophoresiseng
dc.titleSoil microbial contribution to greenhouse gas efflux from a secondary forest in central Missourieng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, environmental and atmospheric sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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