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dc.contributor.advisorCameron, Glen T.eng
dc.contributor.authorPark, Hyojungeng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 5, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Glen T. Cameron.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This study primarily attempted to achieve a better understanding of how a conversational human voice versus a corporate tone of voice affects key publics' responses to an organization, especially in the context of a crisis. Another aim of this study was to explore how type of source and crisis response strategies interplay with each other and with tone of voice in blog-mediated crisis communication. To test hypotheses and research questions, this study used a 2 (tone of voice: human vs. organizational) x 2 (source: public relations executive vs. private citizen) x 2 (type of crisis response: defensive vs. accommodative) mixed experimental design with tone of voice and type of source as within-subjects factors and type of crisis response as a between-subjects factor. The results indicate that having a human presence on an organization's blog through using the first-person voice and personal narratives, as opposed to an organizational presence, increased perceptions of conversational human voice and interactivity in the online communication. These perceptions subsequently resulted in positive outcomes of crisis communication, such as public acceptance of an organization's response to a crisis, as well as behavioral intentions toward an organization in crisis. The findings suggest that the success of crisis communication strategies on social media may depend on the ability of public relations practitioners to generate an enhanced sense of human presence on their social media pages by using a more conversational tone.eng
dc.format.extentxi, 182 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872562924eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/14509eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/14509
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectsocial presenceeng
dc.subjectcrisis communicationeng
dc.subjecttone of voiceeng
dc.subjectcrisis responseeng
dc.titleSocial presence and source credibility in blog-mediated crisis communicationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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