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dc.contributor.advisorVolz, Yongeng
dc.contributor.authorSu, Jingeng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 8, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Yong Volzeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This study explores how the news environment might affect the news framing of public health disasters. Specifically, it examines the coverage of the 2008 Chinese milk disaster in four different types of Chinese newspapers. The four newspapers are selected according to their different news environment, which is measured by the level of government control over them. The study finds that the news environment is exhibited through their choices of framing. The higher the level of government control is over a newspaper, the more likely the newspaper will define a public health disaster as an accident, attribute responsibility to individuals and diminish conflicts. This rule is well reflected by the full government controlled newspaper, People's Daily, and the liberal newspaper, Southern Weekend, but the effect of news environment is not significant on the semi-government-controlled newspaper, China Youth Daily, and the market-oriented newspaper, West China City Daily. The market-oriented newspaper is not necessary more outspoken than the semi-government-controlled newspaper, though the level of government control over the latter is considered to be lower than the former. The frame building and selection of these two newspapers are probably determined by their newsroom traditions and economic considerations.eng
dc.format.extentviii, 114 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14584
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2011 UM restricted theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011 Theseseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectstory framingeng
dc.subjectpublic healtheng
dc.subjectnews environmenteng
dc.subjectnewsroom traditionseng
dc.subjectgovernment controleng
dc.titleFraming public health disaster: Chinese newspaper coverage of the contaminated milk powder affaireng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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