[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBowders, John J. (John Joseph), 1957-eng
dc.contributor.authorRasch, Shane M.eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 11, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. John J. Bowders, Jr.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Civil engineering.eng
dc.description"December 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractNon destructive subsurface investigation using electromagnetic (EM) waves is a growing technique in geotechnical engineering (Mohamed 2006). The ability to “see” under the Earth's surface without having to excavate is important since the soil remains intact and undisturbed. When there is a discontinuity in dielectric constants, a portion of the EM energy is reflected and the remainder is refracted into the next material. The reflected EM wave indicates detection of an object, a change in material, or a void or crack in the subsurface. The composition of a soil-water system (i.e. how much water or air is in the soil) will control the reflection and refraction of an EM wave traveling through the soil-water system. Pure water at 20 degrees Celsius has a dielectric of around 80 and air at one atmosphere pressure and 20 degrees Celsius has a dielectric of 1, thus relative volume of water in the soil is hypothesized to have a greater effect than the dry unit weight on the dielectric constant of the soil-water system. The overall project goal is to better understand the dielectric constant of soil (including the soil-water system) in order to improve subsurface detection methods. Predictive models for dielectric constant of a soil as a function of the EM wave frequency transmitted to the soil as well as a multitude of soil properties, including but not limited to soil water content and dry unit weight (also referred to as dry density), are to be investigated. It is hypothesized that effects of volumetric water content will dominate the effects of dry density on the dielectric constant of a soil water system. The relative influence of these soil properties on the resulting dielectric constant is to be evaluated through dielectric constant testing in this study. Through an extensive series of testing, volumetric water content was found to have up to 525 times more impact on the dielectric constant than dry density, but typical results show this quantifiable difference is more reasonably between 7 and 15 times greater effect for volumetric water content than dry density on the dielectric constant of sand.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 85 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14597
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2011 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2011 Theseseng
dc.subjectdielectric constanteng
dc.subjectvolumetric water contenteng
dc.subjectsubsurface detection methodseng
dc.subjectsoil propertieseng
dc.titleDetermining the relative effects of volumetric water content and dry density on the dielectric constant of soilseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record