• Alliteration in Horace 

    Rundle, Edith Leota (University of Missouri, 1914)
    Questions that this paper will attempt to answer are: Does Horace show a preference for alliteration of any particular letter or letters? If so, is this due to the fact that a proportionately large number of the words of ...
  • Alliteration in the hexameter books of Lucilius 

    Miller, Edith (University of Missouri, 1913)
    It is very evident (1) that Lucilius used the device of alliteration, (2) that he used it very freely, and (3) that he must have used it purposely. In general, his alliteration means nothing, though occasionally it does ...
  • Athena and Ares and a comparison of the two as divinities of war 

    Rogers, Rachel Lucy (University of Missouri, 1905)
    The aim of this paper will be to set forth the conception of Athena as found in the principal early sources of Greek mythology, namely the Iliad and Odyssey of Homer; the Theogonia, Works and Days, and Shield of Heracles, ...
  • The attitude of the ancient Greek writers toward oracles 

    Johnson, Helen M. (Helen Moore), b. 1889 (University of Missouri, 1908)
    The object of this dissertation is to show to what extent the educated people of ancient Greece believed in the reality, power, and authority of the oracles. There is no doubt that the common people believed implicitly. ...
  • A comparison of Cicero's style in his early and late orations 

    Smith, Frances (University of Missouri, 1910)
    Cicero's oratorical activity extends over a period of thirty-eight years. His first oration pro P. Quinctio belongs to the year 81 B.C., his last ones in M. Antonium orationes Phillippicae I-XIV to the years 44 and 43 B.C. ...
  • A comparison of the Dido story of the Aeneid IV with the Ariadne episode in Catullus LXIV 

    Gordon, Eleanor Madge (University of Missouri, 1907)
    When considering carefully the Epyllion of Catullus and Book IV of Virgil's Aeneid, can we say that Virgil was influenced by Catullus? It seems to me we are justified in saying this. Certainly it would not be fair to say ...
  • A critical study of the hexameter of Virgil's Ecologues and Aeneid I-VI, and a Comparison with that of the Culex and Ciris 

    Rabourn, Susie McDowell Weldon (University of Missouri, 1905)
    The object of this paper is two-fold: to discuss the structure of Virgil's Hexameter, giving some of the peculiarities and metrical licenses; and to compare it with his doubtful poems, the Culex and Ciris, noticing whether ...
  • A criticism of Keller's Homeric society 

    Krabiel, Helen Mar (University of Missouri, 1908)
    The sociological study of the Iliad and Odyssey entitled "Homeric Society", and compiled by Albert Galloway Keller, instructor in social science at Yale University, offers much interesting reading, much matter for careful ...
  • Double expressions in the speeches of Sallust 

    Leaphart, Charles William (University of Missouri, 1906)
    There is no doubt that the speeches in Sallust's histories are not quoted exactly but that, in accordance with the custom prevailing in classical times, words are put into the mouth of the speaker which might have been ...
  • The dramatic function of the Aeschylean chorus 

    Johnson, Franklin Plotinus, b. 1896 (University of Missouri, 1915)
    The qualities of the Aeschylean chorus are distinct from the ideal Schlegelian chorus as has been shown by many works listed here. With these conclusions as a foundation, the author determines what office is actually filled ...
  • The essay in Greek literature 

    Underwood, George Arthur (University of Missouri, 1906)
    That the essay is a form of literature created by Montaigne, that it was unknown before him, and is distinctively modern, is a theory generally prevalent among the literary public of our time. But it is altogether contrary ...
  • Euripides as a poet of nature 

    Nichols, Lulu Edith (University of Missouri, 1902)
    On the shores of Salamis, Euripides used for his study a cave which overlooked the sea, and in this secluded place wrote most of his tragedies. Thus leading a life of seclusion, Euripides devoted much time to studying ...
  • Euripides' idea of God and his attitude toward contemporary religion 

    Boyd, Clarence Eugene (University of Missouri, 1901)
    What were the ideas which Euripides entertained in regard to the divine government of the universe and an over ruling deity and what attitude did he sustain toward the gods of Greece as commonly accepted in his time? This ...
  • The gods of the Aeneid 

    Green, Talitha Jennie (University of Missouri, 1903)
    This thesis contains descriptions and analysis of several of the gods from Virgil's Aeneid.
  • The Homeric house in the light of recent excavations 

    Welch, John Gunn (University of Missouri, 1904)
    The purpose of this paper is to give a detailed description of the Homeric house, according to the information to be had from the Homeric poems, and to compare it with other palaces of early antiquity, such as those of ...
  • Horace as a nature poet 

    Criswell, Vera (University of Missouri, 1912)
    In order to be called a true poet of nature, one must possess a deep appreciation and love for the natural world, and the ability to express this feeling in beautiful and appropriate verse. The men who have attained fame ...
  • Horace's attitude toward the orientalization of Rome 

    White, Dorrance Stinchfield (University of Missouri, 1914)
    It has ever been the history of empire-development that nations face the West. Babylon, snugly esconced in the fertile Tigro-Euphrates valley, subdued its eastern neighbor, the Elamites, rose to power in wealth and court ...
  • Horace's conception of friendship 

    Hall, Alta B. (Alta Bell), b. 1888 (University of Missouri, 1913)
    Friendship is the most elevating of human affections, and yet it is a relation that cannot be explained or defined. It begins and ends in feeling, and feeling is a matter of purely personal organization. It is this subjective ...
  • The infinitive as used by Vergil in his Aeneid 

    Macmillan, Grace Eugenie (University of Missouri, 1902)
    Vergil has made liberal use of his license as a poet, not only in using the infinitive mode in many instances where it would be either unusual in prose, or absolutely non-permissible, but also in his looseness of diction. ...
  • Influence of Catullus on Latin poetry of the Augustan age 

    Beamer, Maude, 1885-1973 (University of Missouri, 1915)
    To what extent Catullus was a factor in the poetry of the Augustan age, or more accurately, what he contributed to it in form and substance is the object of this inquiry. A sympathetic reading of his poems alone assures ...