The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization for translocation identification [abstract]

MOspace/Manakin Repository

Breadcrumbs Navigation

The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization for translocation identification [abstract]

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/1477

[-] show simple item record

dc.contributor.author McFerson, Megan en
dc.date 2006 en
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-28T17:09:19Z en
dc.date.available 2009-05-28T17:09:19Z en
dc.date.issued 2006 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/1477 en
dc.description Abstract only available en
dc.description.abstract To identify all maize chromosomes, (2n=20) a multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization procedure was developed. The procedure utilizes tandemly repeated DNA sequences to generate a distinctive banding pattern for each of the 10 chromosomes. Several different probes were used as a mixture for hybridization to root-tip chromosomes. All of the 10 chromosomes were identified by the banding and color patterns. Another chromosome, called the B chromosome, also shows up in some lines of maize. While its actual purpose is unknown, it undergoes nondisjunction. Nondisjunction is the failure of paired chromosomes to disjoin (separate) during cell division so that both chromosomes go to one daughter cell and none to the other. This nondisjunction plays a role in the dosage affect and how it manipulates gene expression. Previously, translocation was recovered between the B chromosome and the long arm of chromosome 10. Using this B-A translocation, it was crossed with A-A translocated chromosomes to achieve B-A-A translocations. The overall goal of these research projects is to use FISH to identify these translocations. Once spreads are identified using an oil lens and a triple band-pass filter of a Universal microscope and the images are taken using an Optronics MagnaFire charge-coupled device (CCD), the images can be superimposed and edited in Photoshop 7.0. Each individual chromosome can be labeled, and the translocations can be found. This research shows the benefits of FISH for rapid genetic mapping and allows for an easy means of identifying chromosomes. en
dc.description.sponsorship Life Sciences Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program en
dc.language en_US en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University of Missouri - Columbia Office of Undergraduate Research en
dc.source.uri http://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/forums-conferences/abstracts/abstract-detail.php?abstractid= en
dc.subject maize en
dc.subject B chromosome en
dc.subject nondisjunction en
dc.subject gene expression en
dc.title The use of fluorescence in situ hybridization for translocation identification [abstract] en
dc.type Presentation en
dc.contributor.meetingname Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (2006 : University of Missouri--Columbia) en
dc.contributor.corporatename University of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research en
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] show simple item record