Multimedia narratives, data visualization, collaborative news engagement and new media business models: how the world's first academic journalism library enables digital creativity and struggles to preserve the resulting products

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Multimedia narratives, data visualization, collaborative news engagement and new media business models: how the world's first academic journalism library enables digital creativity and struggles to preserve the resulting products

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14830

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Title: Multimedia narratives, data visualization, collaborative news engagement and new media business models: how the world's first academic journalism library enables digital creativity and struggles to preserve the resulting products
Author: Carner, Dorothy
Keywords: media business models
Missouri Method
Date: 2012-08
Abstract: The Missouri Method, practical hands-on training in real-world news media, is still the pedagogy of choice at the Missouri School of Journalism and has been for more than a century. However, today's journalism tools and the products they create have little resemblance to those used in 1908 when the school was founded. The journalism library at the University of Missouri has supported scholars and journalists for more than a century. The mission of the library has never changed, but its role continues to expand to include access to and management of content creation technology. Today, news is created and delivered by methods early twentieth century newspapermen could not even imagine. This paper will share innovative experiments in news media, including: U_News, a collaborative multimedia broadcast using Google + Hangout to create communities; Intersection, a video streamed community discussion platform hosted by public radio; Newsy.com, a multisource video news analysis service; Columbia Missourian, a “digital first” newspaper employing social media engagement tools; and news and magazine applications (apps) created for mobile devices. This paper will also examine emerging media business models like Spot.us, an open source project to pioneer “community powered reporting.” Finally, the paper will share challenges libraries face in assuring that digital objects created today are preserved for tomorrow's historians.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/14830

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