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dc.contributor.authorSutton, Mattheweng
dc.contributor.authorMounsey, Anne L.eng
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Roger G.eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.description.abstractScopolamine should be used to reduce nausea associated with motion sickness, but it does not reduce vomiting. (Strength of Recommendation [SOR]: A, based on multiple randomized controlled trials [RCTs].) Firstgeneration antihistamines (dimenhydrinate and chlorpheniramine) can also be used to reduce nausea associated with motion sickness. (SOR: B, based on multiple RCTs.) Scopolamine is more effective than meclizine (Antivert) and as effective as dimenhydrinate. Ondansetron (Zofran) and the second-generation antihistamines cetirizine (Zyrtec) and fexofenadine (Allegra) do not reduce symptoms of motion sickness and should not be used. (SOR: B, based on small RCTs.) Ginger can be used to reduce symptoms of motion sickness. (SOR: B, based on RCTs with conflicting results.)eng
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Family Physician 86(2) 2012.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/14840eng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Network.eng
dc.subjectnauseaeng
dc.subjectantihistamineeng
dc.subjectmotion sicknesseng
dc.subject.lcshMotion sickness -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshScopolamineeng
dc.subject.lcshAntihistamineseng
dc.subject.lcshGinger -- Therapeutic useeng
dc.titleTreatment of motion sicknesseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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