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dc.contributor.advisorHesse, Colineng
dc.contributor.authorRauscher, Emilyeng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on August 30, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Colin Hesseeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Communication.eng
dc.description"May 2012"eng
dc.description.abstractThroughout the last decade, genetic links have been found to some of the most common diseases in the United States (www.cdc.gov/genomics/gtesting/index.htm). While much research has investigated how families cope with these diseases, little research has explored the communicative processes individuals go through in communicating genetic disease risk to family members. This study explores the family communication of individuals who have tested positive for a gene mutation which puts them at an increased risk for cancer. More specifically, this study utilizes Family Communication Patterns Theory and Communication Privacy Management Theory to investigate the role of family communication and privacy management in an individual's communication about genetic disease risk with family members, as well as individual well-being outcomes from that communication. Results found family communication patterns and privacy management to play important roles in the process of communicating about genetic disease risk in families.eng
dc.format.extentxii, 141 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872568867eng
dc.identifier.otherRauscherE-042412-D648eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/15112eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2012 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2012 Dissertationseng
dc.subjectfamily communicationeng
dc.subjectgenetic cancereng
dc.subjectcommunication privacy managementeng
dc.subjectfamily communication patternseng
dc.titleFamily communication about genetic disease risk: investigating factors promoting disclosure and individual well-beingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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