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dc.contributor.advisorHart, Jennifer L. (Jennifer Lynn), 1967-eng
dc.contributor.authorRathje, Lonelleeng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 7, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Jeni Harteng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionEd. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2012.eng
dc.description"May 2012"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The purpose of this study was to answer the research question of how women understand their roles in middle management, public higher education fund raising. This qualitative study, targeting two public universities in the western region of the U.S., found the current climate of higher education leadership is not consistent with how female directors of development identify as leaders. The overarching essence, "The Ideal and Real: Conflicts and Consequences," highlights the dualistic culture present in fund development organizations in the universities studied. The power play between the realities of organizational work lives and the authentic needs of the women created a complex balancing act for the female participants. The participants believe that upper management publicly projects the accepted ideals of leadership, yet in the end top-down decision making is favored. This dominant and more valued approach to leadership - a power approach - results in conflicts and consequences for the female participants. The women believe their needs, contributions and opportunities to advance are of marginal importance to their universities. Therefore, as key middle-management leaders who secure needed financial support - amid the changing landscape of financing public higher education - the female participants are unhappy with their work lives and are considering alternatives to working in higher education long term. Importantly, this study found that participants are voicing the need for a learner-centered approach to leadership.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvii, 159 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872568766eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/15179eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/15179
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjecthigher educationeng
dc.subjectfund developmenteng
dc.subjectmiddle managementeng
dc.subjectwomen leaderseng
dc.titleWomen in university fund raising : how they understand their roles as leaders in middle managementeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


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