[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFadel, Paul J.eng
dc.contributor.authorKim, Areumeng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 7, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Paul J. Fadeleng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2012.eng
dc.description"May 2012"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The arterial baroreceptors are responsible for mediating rapid reflex adjustments to acute cardiovascular stressors via modulating autonomic nervous system activity to the heart and vasculature. Alterations in the arterial baroreflex control of blood pressure (e.g. decreased sensitivity) have been recognized to potentially contribute to differences in blood pressure control between young men and women. In this work we investigated whether sex differences exist in arterial blood pressure responses to baroreceptor perturbation, and differential mechanisms for the relative contribution of cardiac output and total vascular conductance to baroreflex-mediated changes in blood pressure in young women and men, both at rest and during dynamic exercise. Here we demonstrated that sex differences in the baroreflex control of blood pressure are evident during carotid hypertension, but not carotid hypotension. Furthermore, young women exhibit greater depressor responses to carotid hypertension by virtue of a greater cardiac responsiveness (manifest as a cardiac output response) independent of menstrual cycle phases at rest. During exercise, however, cardiac output is no longer the main mechanism to control blood pressure in women due to greater metabolic demand to contracting skeletal muscles. In conclusion, this dissertation project provides novel insight into understanding influences of sex and endogenous ovarian hormones on arterial baroreflex control of blood pressure, and investigated mechanisms by which the baroreflex-mediated blood pressure response is controlled at rest and during dynamic exercise. This project suggests that fundamental mechanisms of sex differences exist in blood pressure regulation.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.format.extentxiii, 161 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb90811604eng
dc.identifier.oclc811618387eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/15182
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/15182eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjectarterial blood pressureeng
dc.subjectbaroreceptor perturbationeng
dc.subjectcardiac responsivenesseng
dc.subjectsex differenceseng
dc.subjectblood pressure regulationeng
dc.titleThe effects of sex and ovarian hormones on arterial baroreflex control of blood pressure in humanseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineMedical Pharmacology and Physiology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record