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dc.contributor.advisorKramer, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCracken, Megan J.
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012 Springen_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 19, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Joanne Krameren_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri-Columbia 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Veterinary biomedical sciences.en_US
dc.description"May 2012"en_US
dc.description.abstractRecently developed wireless inertial sensor systems provide a means to objectively detect lameness as a horse is trotted over natural footing. The purpose of this study was to compare one such inertial sensor based system to subjective evaluation performed by experienced equine practitioners of horses with lameness induced by sole pressure. Fifteen horses were fitted with special shoes, which allowed for lameness induction via sole pressure. Before each trial the horses were fitted with three wireless inertial sensors. Horses were subjected to multiple trials: 1) immediately before inserting the screw, 2) immediately after inserting the screw to just touch the sole, and 3) after gradually tightening the screw in half turn increments. The number of half turns of the screw required for consistent identification of lameness in the correct limb by the inertial sensors and through the consensus of three equine veterinarians was compared using the Wilcoxon's sum rank test. The inertial sensor system selected the correct limb sooner (i.e., after few screw turns) than the veterinarians (P<0.0001). The 3 veterinarians selected the correct limb before the inertial sensors in five trials (8.3%). The opposite occurred in 43 trials (71.6%). The 3 veterinarians and the computer simultaneously selected the correct limb in 12 trials (20%). The inertial sensor based system was more sensitive relative to the consensus of 3 equine veterinarians to identify the affected limb in horses subjected to sole pressure induced lameness.en_US
dc.format.extentvii, 40 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.merlinb94309395
dc.identifier.oclc819339133
dc.identifier.otherMcCrackenM-031412-T1621
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/15407
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2012 MU restricted theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2012 Theses
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the University of Missouri - Columbia.en_US
dc.subjectkinematicsen_US
dc.subjectinertial sensoren_US
dc.subjectequine lamenessen_US
dc.subjectsole pressureen_US
dc.subject.lcshLameness in horses -- Diagnosis
dc.subject.lcshHorses -- Paces, gaits, etc
dc.subject.lcshBiosensors
dc.subject.lcshKinematics
dc.titleComparison of an inertial sensor based system of lameness quantification to subjective lameness evaluationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary biomedical sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary biomedical scienceseng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US


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