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dc.contributor.advisorLamberson, William R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSelby, Catherine Clare
dc.date.issued2012
dc.date.submitted2012 Springen_US
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on September 19, 2012).en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. William R. Lambersonen_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionM.S. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Animal sciences.en_US
dc.description"May 2012"en_US
dc.description.abstractArtemisia afra (AF) is a herb used by indigenous peoples of South Africa to alleviate heat stress during desert travel, and Artemisia absinthium (AB) is a related plant grown in the U. S. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of AF and/or AB on metabolic rate and activity in mice, and semen quality in boars. Male mice (n = 49) were housed in a neutral environment (21°C) and given ad libitum access to a 1% w/v decoction of AF, AB, or tap water (TW). Mice were then exposed to a heat stress environment (35°C) for 5 days. Metabolic rate was calculated based on O2 consumption, CO2 production and respiratory exchange ratio collected in individual indirect calorimeters. Metabolic rate was higher (P = 0.06) in AB overall. Both AB and AF had a higher (P = 0.001) tail temperature than TW during the heat stress period. No difference was seen in activity. Subsequently, six 8-mo old boars were assigned in a crossover design to be given a decoction of AB or TW before and during a 5-d period in a heat stress (32°C) chamber. Boars were collected for 5-wk following the initiation of heat stress. Boars given AB (1400 hr) had a lower ear temperature (P=0.02) than those given TW (1400 hr). Boars given TW (1400 hr) had a higher shoulder temperature (P=0.04) than TW (400 h). Liquid consumption of TW was higher than AB (P=0.003). Semen quality measurements showed a significant difference within a week following heat stress, but there was no difference between treatments.en_US
dc.format.extentix, 90 pagesen_US
dc.identifier.otherSelbyC-050412-T430
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/15408
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2012 MU restricted theses (MU)
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2012 Theses
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the University of Missouri - Columbia.en_US
dc.subjectheat stressen_US
dc.subjectfertilityen_US
dc.subjectmetabolic rateen_US
dc.subjectArtemisia afraen_US
dc.subjectArtemisia absinthiumen_US
dc.titleMitigation of effects from heat stress by Artemisia speciesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal scienceseng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US


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