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dc.contributor.authorAbright, Natalieeng
dc.contributor.authorBruhn, Johann Nikolauseng
dc.contributor.authorMihail, Jeanne D.eng
dc.contributor.authorBatchelder, M. Jamilaeng
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Amanda J.eng
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.contributor.meetingnameUndergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (2007 : University of Missouri--Columbia)eng
dc.date2007eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.descriptionAbstract only availableeng
dc.description.abstractWith its rich burgundy color and fine nutty flavor, the Wine-Cap Stropharia (Stropharia rugoso-annulata) is popular among backyard mushroom cultivators in temperate climates, especially in Europe and China. This mushroom has great untapped potential in the United States. Simple and inexpensive to grow, "Wine-Caps" could be ideal for Missouri mycophiles to cultivate in their own backyards for food and as a secondary source of income. We established 18 experimental blocks each consisting of four 1 m² beds inoculated with Stropharia spawn. The beds were set up on a northwest-facing, hardwood-shaded slope at the Horticulture and Agroforestry Research Center outside New Franklin, Missouri. We tested the effects of three variables on Stropharia production: inoculation date, straw versus a mixture of wood-chips and soil as substrate, and the presence or absence of weed barrier fabric beneath the substrate. Experiment 1 consisted of eight blocks inoculated on July 19, 2006. Experiment 2 consisted of ten blocks inoculated on August 30, 2006. Experiment 1 began fruiting on September 15, after 58 days, and had produced 90% of its total number of mushrooms by Day 83. Experiment 2 began fruiting on October 13, after 44 days, and had produced 90% of its total number of mushrooms by Day 61. Experiment 2 produced 3.1 times as many mushrooms as Experiment 1 above the median mushroom mass (33.72 g) for the entire study. Straw beds produced a greater total number, mean mass and total mass of mushrooms than wood-chip beds in Experiment 1. These relationships hold in Experiment 2, except for mean mass. Untarped beds produced a greater number and total mass of mushrooms than tarped beds in Experiment 1, but the effect of tarping was insignificant in Experiment 2. We look forward to evaluating further production by these initial experiments during spring 2007.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipCAFNR On Campus Research Internshipeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/1545eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forumeng
dc.source.urihttp://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/forums-conferences/abstracts/abstract-detail.php?abstractid=eng
dc.subjectmushroom cultivationeng
dc.subjecteconomic benefitseng
dc.titleWine-cap stropharia: A new mushroom for Missouri mycophiles and agroforestry [abstract]eng


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