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dc.contributor.advisorBarrett, Bruce A.eng
dc.contributor.authorKeesey, Ian W.eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 18, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Bruce A. Barretteng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Plant, insect and microbial sciences.eng
dc.description"May 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractThe most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOC) from chestnut reproductive plant tissue (catkin, nut and bur) were identified with gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry (GC-MS). Two-choice behavioral bioassays were conducted with a Y-tube olfactometer using chestnut plant tissues (leaf, catkin, nut and bur) and individual VOC to assess the response of adult lesser chestnut weevil, Curculio sayi. Additionally, the electrophysiological response of the antennae of C. sayi adults towards both plant tissue and individual VOC from chestnut was examined using an electroantennogram (EAG). The behavioral bioassay and EAG data associated with chestnut plant tissue demonstrated that the insect does not respond directly to the sites of oviposition (nut tissue), but rather more strongly to the spiked bur encasing the nuts, the leaves, and the spring florescence (catkins). There were several differences between male and female responses to plant tissue and individual VOC, as well as significant differences between those insects collected in the spring compared to those from the fall season. A qualitative analysis of the reproductive organs of C. sayi adults revealed distinct differences in their development across the spring and fall seasons for both males and females.eng
dc.format.extentxviii, 187 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872561017eng
dc.identifier.otherKeeseyI-101012-D6245eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/15778eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2011 Freely available dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertationseng
dc.subjectinsect behavioreng
dc.subjectolfactometereng
dc.subjectsemiochemicalseng
dc.subjectelectroantennogrameng
dc.subjectchemical ecologyeng
dc.titleThe chemical ecology of the lesser chestnut weevil: behavioral and electrophysiological responses of Curculio sayi (Coleoptera: curculionidae) to host-plant volatile organic compoundseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant, insect and microbial sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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