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dc.contributor.advisorRose, Amanda J. (Amanda Janel), 1971-eng
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Rhiannon L.eng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 29, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Professor Amanda J. Roseeng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"May 2011"eng
dc.description.abstractRelationships with peers and friends are important and influential in the lives of youth, especially in adolescence (Buhrmester & Furman, 1987). Although attention recently has been drawn to the important roles of race, ethnicity, culture, and diversity in youths' peer group interactions (Graham, Taylor, & Ho, 2008), surprisingly little is known about the formation of dyadic friendships between youths of differing ethnic backgrounds. The current research examines the prevalence of cross-ethnic friendships and the socioemotional adjustment correlates of cross-ethnic friendships among 6th through 8th grade adolescent youth in an ethnically diverse urban middle school (N = 372). Youths responded to questionnaires in their classrooms at school. Results indicated that cross-ethnic friendships were more prevalent than previously thought, and importantly, the findings for prevalence differed based on the method used to assess friendships. Gender, developmental, and ethnic differences in cross-ethnic friendship prevalence also were tested. In addition, relations between youths' socioemotional adjustment and participation in cross-ethnic friendships were examined. Youths with advanced social perspective-taking skills had more cross-ethnic friends, whereas youths who experienced perceived barriers to forming cross-ethnic friendships had fewer cross-ethnic friends. Prosocial behavior, likeability among peers, depression, and anxiety were unrelated to cross-ethnic friendship. Associations of perceived popularity with cross-ethnic friendship were positive for boys, but negative for girls. In addition, youths' ethnic identity was differently associated with cross-ethnic friendship for ethnic minority versus nonminority White youth. Applied implications are discussed. Race relations is a complex and compelling issue, and understanding youths' friendships with peers who are different from themselves in terms of race/ethnicity will help to illuminate ways to foster positive intergroup relations.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentvi, 71 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872561355eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/15838eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/15838
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjectsocial cognitioneng
dc.subjectadolescent populationeng
dc.subjectsocial adjustmenteng
dc.subjectemotional adjustmenteng
dc.titleYouths' cross-ethnic friendships and associations with socioemotional adjustmenteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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