[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWakefield, Bonnieeng
dc.contributor.authorGroves, Patricia S.eng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertationseng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 25, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Bonnie Wakefieldeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri-Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Nursing.eng
dc.description"May 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Patient safety is a matter of great concern to consumers, healthcare providers, and health services researchers. Within hospital organizations, bedside nurses provide care to patients within a complex environment, relying on a culture of safety to support their efforts to keep patients safe. Because little is known about this work of nursing, a Structuration Theory of Safety Culture was used to frame an exploration of the process by which hospital staff nurses (agents) keep patients safe, while constrained/enabled by sets of safety rules and resources (safety culture structures) in the organization. Utilizing the grounded theory methods of constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling, interviews were conducted with bedside nurses from multiple units of a single U.S. hospital for purposes of explicating this process. Findings revealed that the participants managed the inherent risks of hospitalization through a process of risk assessment and recognition, prioritization, and a variety of protective interventions in order to prevent harm to patients. Nurse participants felt an organizational and professional responsibility to protect patients from risks emanating from the patient, environment, and staff. Further research is needed to examine the nursing concept of patient safety and explore this process in detail.eng
dc.format.extentxi, 134 pageseng
dc.identifier.merlinb93919128eng
dc.identifier.oclc816522357eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/15848
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/15848eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjectpatient safetyeng
dc.subjectstructuration theoryeng
dc.subjectgrounded theoryeng
dc.subjecthospitalizationeng
dc.subject.meshNurse's Roleeng
dc.subject.meshPatient Safetyeng
dc.subject.meshModels, Organizationaleng
dc.subject.meshSafety Management -- organization & administrationeng
dc.subject.meshHealth Facility Administrationeng
dc.subject.meshMedical Errors -- prevention & controleng
dc.subject.meshOrganizational Cultureeng
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff -- organization & administrationeng
dc.subject.meshCommunicationeng
dc.titleExploring the intersection between safety culture and hospital nursing practiceeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineNursing (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record