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dc.contributor.advisorCameron, Glen T.eng
dc.contributor.authorJeong, JiYeoneng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2011 Dissertationseng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 25, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Glen T. Cameroneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"May 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] Taking an affective and cognitive approach toward effective conflict management communication, this study attempts to analyze the mediating and moderating factors affecting health journalists' perception processes about conflict issues in accordance with the conflict management life cycle. By integrating strategic conflict management, agenda-building theory, and the emotion of anger, this study investigates the following concerns: 1) how health journalists' perceptions of an organization's responsibility during a health-related crisis affect their expectations of the organization's stance and strategy; 2) if health journalists' levels of anger about a crisis mediate the relationship between their perceptions of an organization's responsibility for the crisis and their expectations of the organization's stance and strategy in response to the crisis; and 3) whether either the concept of agenda-building as an issue management technique or the expression of sympathy as an initial response to a crisis can be utilized to moderate (lessen) journalists' levels of anger in association with their perceptions of an organization's responsibility. To address these concerns, this study conducts a 2 x 2 x 2 mixed-subjects experiment with health journalists that examined organizational crisis responsibility (high vs. low), information explaining agenda-building (present vs. absent), and expression of sympathy (present vs. absent). The results of this study reveal that health journalists' perceptions of crisis responsibility affect their expectations of an organization's stance and strategy. Perceived crisis responsibility is newly proposed as an addition to the list of contingency factors as a situational variable. The results also indicate that health journalists' levels of anger function as a mediating factor in the relationship between their perceptions of crisis responsibility and their expectations of an organization's stance and strategy. It also provides a rationale for the need to identify moderating factors to lessen public anger before the public forms its expectations of an organization's stance. Even though the moderating effects, information explaining agenda-building, and expression of sympathy were not supported, this research represents an important initial step in the analysis of these moderating variables. It also represents a pioneering endeavor to test the function of agenda-building as a proactive issue management technique. This study provides a necessary addition to the development of public relations theory and acts as a launching point for subsequent research. In practical application, the results of this study add to the body of knowledge regarding the influence of public relations practitioners on the media, particularly in the health field, and may help practitioners to profit from their strategic conflict management decisions in response to a crisis.eng
dc.format.extentx, 135 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872562078eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/15854
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/15854eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjectconflict managementeng
dc.subjectcontingency theoryeng
dc.subjectagenda buildingeng
dc.subjecthealth journalismeng
dc.titleMediating and moderating factors that affect health journalists' perceptions of conflict issueseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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