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dc.contributor.advisorMilyo, Jeffreyeng
dc.contributor.authorKim, Eun Youngeng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 25, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Jeffrey Milyoeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.description"May, 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT REQUEST OF AUTHOR.] This dissertation is a compilation of three essays. The first essay critiques a recent paper by Wilper et al. (2009) for its inappropriate model calibration in analyzing the association of health insurance and mortality. Using the individual-level data from a nationwide survey with more recent mortality follow-up information, it shows that the privately-insured do not significantly fare better in mortality risk compared to the uninsured. Moreover, hazard ratio estimate for the Medicaid suggests that public provision of insurance increases mortality. The second essay addresses the role of income in explaining the differential public health outcomes across developed countries. Noting that the growing arguments for socioeconomic gradient in health are based mostly on cross-sectional studies, panel analyses of five different public health outcomes are conducted. Results demonstrate that economic development remains critical in explaining health improvements at the aggregate level. The third essay analyzes the association of income and health care spending at the aggregate level. Using a large panel data from 24 industrialized nations for more than three decades, the close relationship between income and health care spending is established. In contrast to earlier cross-sectional studies, the panel analysis suggests that health expenditure growth is not as rapid as income growth in almost all nations.eng
dc.format.extentix, 101 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872562086eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/15855
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/15855eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjecthealth expenditureeng
dc.subjecthealth insuranceeng
dc.subjectpublic healtheng
dc.subjecthazard ratioeng
dc.subjectmortalityeng
dc.titleEssays in health economics and health policyeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomics (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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