Efficacy of bibliotherapy as a treatment for low sexual desire in women

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Efficacy of bibliotherapy as a treatment for low sexual desire in women

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/15859

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Title: Efficacy of bibliotherapy as a treatment for low sexual desire in women
Author: Balzer, Alexandra M.
Keywords: hypoactive sexual desire disorder
self-help intervention
bibliotherapy
Date: 2012
Publisher: University of Missouri--Columbia
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a self-help intervention (e.g. bibliotherapy) for women experiencing low sexual desire who are married, heterosexual, and happy with their relationships. This study compared 45 participants' scores on measures of sexual desire, sexual arousal, and other components of sexual functioning across two bibliotherapy groups (participants either read A Tired Woman's Guide to Passionate Sex (Mintz, 2009) or Reclaiming Your Sexual Self: How You Can Bring Desire Back into Your Life (Hall, 2004)) and a wait-list control group. A total of 45 participants were included and completed measures six weeks apart. Results indicated that participants in a combined intervention group (e.g. those who received either one of the two bibliotherapy interventions) demonstrated statistically greater gains across time in sexual desire, satisfaction, lubrication, orgasm, and sexual functioning, as compared to the control group. Those who read A Tired Woman's Guide to Passionate Sex demonstrated significantly greater gains in sexual desire, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and overall sexual functioning across time as compared to the control group and exhibited significantly greater gains in sexual desire, lubrication, and overall sexual functioning across time as compared to participants who read Reclaiming Your Sexual Self: How You Can Bring Desire Back into Your Life. Those who read Reclaiming Your Sexual Self: How You Can Bring Desire Back into Your Life made statistically greater gains over time in sexual desire, lubrication, and orgasm as compared to the control group.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/15859
Other Identifiers: BalzerA-071812-D581

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