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dc.contributor.advisorKerns, John Gerald, 1971-eng
dc.contributor.authorCicero, Davideng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on October 26, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: John Kernseng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description"July 2012"eng
dc.description.abstractThe current dissertation contains six studies that examine the roles of aberrant salience and self-relevant information processing in the development and maintenance of psychotic and psychotic-like experiences. Aberrant salience is the incorrect or unusual assignment of salience, importance, or significance to stimuli. Self-relevant information processing includes self-concept clarity (SCC) and self-esteem. SCC reflects the coherence of self-concept, and self-esteem can be broadly defined as the valence with which one views oneself. The first four studies included large samples (n = 724, 667, 744, 998) of participants oversampled for psychosis risk. The fifth study (n = 160) included participants at risk for developing schizophrenia. Study 6 included a group of participants with schizophrenia (n = 53) and a comparison group of controls without a history of mental illness (n = 33). In the first five studies, an interaction between aberrant salience and SCC was found such that participants with high aberrant salience and low SCC had the highest levels of psychotic-like experiences, measured with both questionnaires and interviews. In Study 3, in contrast to low SCC, neuroticism did not interact with aberrant salience to predict psychotic-like experiences. Additionally, aberrant salience and SCC did not interact to predict social anhedonia or paranoia. Finally, Study 6 found that participants with schizophrenia had higher aberrant salience and lower SCC and that these two variables interacted (in a different pattern from Study 1-Study 4) to predict positive--but not negative or disorganized—symptoms of schizophrenia.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.format.extentx, 179 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872566293eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/15867eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/15867
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjectself-concept clarityeng
dc.subjectschizophreniaeng
dc.subjectpsychotic-like experienceseng
dc.subjectaberrant salienceeng
dc.titleUnderstanding delusions : the role of aberrant salience and self-relevant information processingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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