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dc.contributor.advisorGregory, Rabiaeng
dc.contributor.authorTallent, Danieleng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2012 Theseseng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on November 5, 2012).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Rabia Gregoryeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Religious studies.eng
dc.description"July 2012"eng
dc.description.abstractSince their discovery, the Qumran community and the texts of the Dead Sea Scrolls have often been viewed through the lens of contemporary and later religious groups, such as the Pharisees, Sadducees, or Christians. In this thesis I argue that, to properly understand Qumran, one must first consider the community's beliefs and behaviors in light of their particular cultural and historical setting. The Qumran community conceived of history as being a cycle of punishment, redemption, and reward ordained by YHWH as a result of Israel's adherence to or disregard of the Israelite covenant. The Qumran community formed and existed as a result of perceived covenant disregard by the larger Judaean populace, and as a result felt it was necessary to form a separate community, or “remnant”, within Israel in which the covenant could be obeyed in full. Qumran's manifestations of behavior that separated them wider Judaean society - their disregard for the Temple, ascetic lifestyles, and systems of initiation and pedagogy - are best understood as a means of preserving the internal efficacy of this covenant remnant until the imminent eschaton. This is supported by textual and material evidence, and is particularly evident in some of the community's oldest documents, such as the Damascus Document and MMT.eng
dc.format.extentiv, 114 pageseng
dc.identifier.otherTallentD-062912-T467eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/15972eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2012 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.subjectDead Sea scrollseng
dc.subjectasceticismeng
dc.subjectQumran communityeng
dc.subjectJudaean societyeng
dc.title"Until God shall visit the Earth": the role of covenant theology in the Qumran movementeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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