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dc.contributor.authorZamzow, Racheleng
dc.contributor.authorSaklayen, S. S.eng
dc.contributor.authorMoffitt, Amandaeng
dc.contributor.authorBodner, Kimberly E.eng
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, K. F.eng
dc.contributor.authorChrist, Shawneng
dc.contributor.authorBeversdorf, David Q.eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.description.abstractAutism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social interaction deficits, communication impairments, and restricted, repetitive behaviors. ASD, with estimates of incidence as high as 1 in 88 individuals, has a largely unknown etiology. Pharmacological intervention is currently being explored to improve symptoms of ASD, including those in the social domain. Social interaction deficits in this population may include facial processing abnormalities, such as reduced eye contact, and increased fixation on less socially-salient facial regions, such as the mouth. However, there is variability in the degree of these deficits in the current literature. Additionally, it has been previously hypothesized that stress mediates poor facial processing in individuals with ASD. This pilot study examines the effect of propranolol, a nonselective beta-adrenergic antagonist anxiolytic, on facial processing in individuals with ASD and typically developing controls.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/16036
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Health Sciences Research Day.eng
dc.subjectautism spectrum disordereng
dc.subjectfacial processing abnormalitieseng
dc.subjectpharmacotherapyeng
dc.subject.lcshAutism spectrum disorderseng
dc.subject.lcshSympatholytic agents -- Therapeutic useeng
dc.subject.lcshFace perceptioneng
dc.titleEffect of propranolol on facial processing in autism spectrum disordereng
dc.typePostereng


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