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dc.contributor.advisorZephir, Flore, 1958-eng
dc.contributor.authorForbes, Michelle Anneng
dc.date.issued2011eng
dc.date.submitted2011 Springeng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on February 1, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Flore Zephireng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2011.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Romance languages.eng
dc.description"May 2011"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Garífuna is the language of the Garífuna people, African descendants who live mostly on the Atlantic coast of Belize, Guatemala and Honduras (including some communities in the United States). Labeled linguistically as an Arawak language, Garífuna also displays influences from other languages as a result of a series of language contact events beginning around the 16th or 17th century in the Lesser Antillean islands of the Caribbean. The purpose of this dissertation is to discuss the linguistic origins of the Garífuna language and give a chronological account of its history to modern times. There is evidence to suggest that there were not two separate languages spoken on St. Vincent (Arawak and Carib) but rather one shared language (Arawak) alongside a Carib pidgin that was spoken only by the men when engaging in trade with South American mainlanders. Central to this dissertation is the application of theories in contact linguistics to explain how it was possible that a group of Africans could have experienced a complete assimilation, in language and in culture, to the Native Indian inhabitants of St. Vincent. Finally the voices of the modern Garífunas of Livingston, Guatemala are included in sections on the current status of Garífuna language and plans for language planning and revitalization.eng
dc.format.extentx,269 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872560116eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/16298
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/16298eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjectlanguage contact eventeng
dc.subjectlanguage originseng
dc.subjectcontact linguisticseng
dc.subjectlanguage revitalizationeng
dc.titleGarifuna: the birth and rise of an identity through contact langugage and contact cultureeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineRomance Languages and Literature (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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