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dc.contributor.authorNamak, Shahlaeng
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Julienne K.eng
dc.contributor.authorKramer, Rochelleeng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Network.eng
dc.date.issued2013-01eng
dc.description.abstractPatients with type 2 diabetes who aren't on insulin and perform self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) show small but significant reductions in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) at 6 months but not at 12 months (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of disease-oriented evidence). Patients with a baseline HbA1c <8% who self-monitor don't reduce their HbA1c levels, but patients with a baseline HbA1c >8% do (SOR: B, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of disease-oriented evidence). More frequent SMBG—4 to 7 times weekly—doesn't reduce HbA1c more than less frequent self-monitoring—1 or 2 times a week (SOR: B, a systematic review and meta-analysis of disease-oriented evidence).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 62(1) 2013: 39+.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/16311eng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.subjectblood glucoseeng
dc.subjectself-monitoringeng
dc.subjectnon-insulin dependenteng
dc.subject.lcshBlood sugar monitoringeng
dc.subject.lcshDiabeticseng
dc.subject.lcshNon-insulin-dependent diabetes -- Alternative treatmenteng
dc.titleDo patients with type 2 diabetes who aren't taking insulin benefit from self-monitoring blood glucose?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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