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dc.contributor.authorMcFarland, Kaceyeng
dc.contributor.authorCostello, K.eng
dc.contributor.authorGrant, D.eng
dc.contributor.authorCostello, Coreyeng
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Sheila Anneng
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.contributor.meetingnameUndergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (2007 : University of Missouri--Columbia)eng
dc.date2007eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.descriptionAbstract only availableeng
dc.description.abstractOver twenty million hernia repair surgeries are performed worldwide each year. Many of these repairs are accomplished through the use of a prosthetic mesh material rather than sutures because meshes have been shown to reduce post-operative complications and recurrence rates. Long-term implants, such as hernia meshes, continuously activate the inflammatory response, bathing the material with oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorous acid. Polypropylene, the most commonly-used hernia repair material worldwide, is an aliphatic hydrocarbon, which is susceptible to oxidation. Constant exposure of the mesh to these oxidants may lead to degradation of the material over time. There is evidence that many patients experience chronic pain and/or embrittlement of the mesh material over time, particularly for polypropylene hernia mesh materials. For this reason, mechanical testing was utilized to characterize polypropylene meshes explanted from human subjects to determine if oxidative degradation could play a role in these changes. We expected to find a decrease in the overall strength and percent elongation of the materials and increase in Young's Modulus after exposure to the harsh biological environment.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of Engineering Undergraduate Research Optioneng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/1759eng
dc.languageen_USeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forumeng
dc.source.urihttp://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/forums-conferences/abstracts/abstract-detail.php?abstractid=eng
dc.subjectprosthetic mesh materialeng
dc.subjectinflammatory responseeng
dc.subjectpolypropyleneeng
dc.subjectoxidative degradationeng
dc.titleInvestigation of the mechanical strength of explanted polypropylene hernia meshes [abstract]eng
dc.typePresentationeng


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