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dc.contributor.authorTruesdale, Angelaeng
dc.contributor.authorSchwaerzel, Martineng
dc.contributor.authorZars, Troy Danieleng
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.contributor.meetingnameSummer Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (2004 : University of Missouri--Columbia)eng
dc.date2004eng
dc.date.issued2004eng
dc.descriptionAbstract only availableeng
dc.description.abstractMemories can arise from simpler habituation and sensitization training as well as associative classical conditioning. However, in a complex environment, animals receive sensory cues in a fashion that can be more accurately described as having some habituation, sensitization and associative components. The relation between these types of memories at the molecular, systems and behavioral level remain largely unexplored. We can alter the timing of odor and electric shock presentation to induce all three types of memory in a defensive olfactory jump reflex. Habituation is a short-term change in behavior as a response to a repetitive stimulus. Using seven odors, we showed flies habituate their jump reflex to background levels of jump probabilities with ten odor presentations. Interestingly, the seven odors tested can be categorized into three groups based on their habituation rates: a high jump probability, a low jump probability, or a no-jump probability. Also, odors show some specificity as habituation of one odor does not lead to a total loss of jump response (complete cross-habituation) although it is reduced (partial cross-habituation). We chose to use six odors for further analysis. Sensitization is defined as an interference with habituation because of a dishabituating stimulus. Using electric shock as a potential sensitization cue, we presented shock and immediately tested jump probability. Interestingly, we found unpaired electric shock increased the jump probability with all odors tested, even those that do not induce a naïve jump. Classical (Pavlovian) conditioning arises when an animal associates a neutral stimulus with one that induces a reflex. Preliminary tests suggest that the paired presentation of electric shock and odor does not increase the jump probability of subsequent odor presentation. With the establishment of these three behavioral paradigms, the stage is set to investigate the interaction of habituation and sensitization on associate classical conditioning. Future experimentation should determine the relationship of the molecular and neural systems underlying these different forms of memory.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipLife Sciences Undergraduate Research Opportunity Programeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2014eng
dc.languageen_USeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartof2004 Summer Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forumeng
dc.source.urihttp://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/forums-conferences/abstracts/abstract-detail.php?abstractid=eng
dc.subjectolfactory jump reflexeng
dc.subjectjump probabilitieseng
dc.subjectmemoryeng
dc.subjecthabituationeng
dc.subjectsensitization trainingeng
dc.titleThe effects of sensitization on habituation using the olfactory jump reflex in Drosophilaeng
dc.typePresentationeng


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