[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRoehrick, Katherineeng
dc.contributor.authorBolls, Pauleng
dc.contributor.corporatenameUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.contributor.meetingnameSummer Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (2005 : University of Missouri--Columbia)eng
dc.date2005eng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.descriptionAbstract only availableeng
dc.description.abstractDuring the election season, it may appear that television viewers are bombarded with political advertisements. Furthermore, it may also appear that the majority of these advertisements are routinely negative. It has been said that candidates use attack advertisements because they work; that is to say, attack advertisements are more memorable than non-attack advertisements. Much research has been done on political advertisements, with mixed conclusions on the effectiveness of attack versus non-attack advertisements. My research on the effect of arousing advertisements attempts to add clarity to the question of if and why attack advertisements affect memory to a greater degree than non-attacks advertisements. I will directly test the hypothesis that memory is not necessarily affected by the content of the advertisements (i.e. attack or non-attack), but rather by the production values of the advertisements (i.e. how arousing the advertisement is). If this hypothesis is true, the direct implication is that candidates do not have to design a negative attack advertisement to be successful in their campaign, but rather they can create arousing, positive advertisements that focus solely on themselves and their position. Consequently, I believe that advertisers will be able to use the results of my research to help them create more suitable and effective advertisements. The study will test the dependent variables of attention, emotional valence, memory, and attitude. Attention to the advertisements will be measured by obtaining a participant's heart rate. Deceleration of heart rate is indicative of attention to the message. Emotional valence will be measured through facial EMG (measurement of smile and frown muscle activity). Memory will be tested through a recognition test. Attitudes toward the advertisements will be measured through the use of a questionnaire.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipMU Undergraduate Research Scholars Programeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2189eng
dc.languageen_USeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartof2005 Summer Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forum (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Office of Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievements Forumeng
dc.source.urihttp://undergradresearch.missouri.edu/forums-conferences/abstracts/abstract-detail.php?abstractid=eng
dc.subjectproduction values of political advertisementseng
dc.subjectattack versus non-attack advertisementseng
dc.titleThe effects of arousing video on attention and memory for attack vs. non-attack political advertisementseng
dc.typePresentationeng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record