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dc.contributor.authorMayfield, Wayne A. (Wayne Andrew), 1966-eng
dc.contributor.authorThornburg, Kathy R.eng
dc.contributor.authorScott, Jacqueline L., 1963-eng
dc.coverage.spatialMiddle Westeng
dc.date.issued2002eng
dc.description.abstractFindings from a study of 2,022 indicate subsidized programs tend to be less likely to offer teacher benefits in the area of health insurance, paid sick leave, and retirement benefits. However, they are more likely to offer a reduction in tuition, for the children of staff. Additionally, teachers in subsidized programs tend to have less formal education. Findings were somewhat different for programs in urban and rural communities.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by HHS Child Care Bureau and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundationeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2282eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherCenter for Family Policy & Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Center for Family Policy and Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPolicy Brief (Center for Family Policy & Research)eng
dc.source.urihttp://cfpr.missouri.edu/teachedsub9_08.pdfeng
dc.subjectearly childhood ; child care ; subsidy ; urban ; ruraleng
dc.subject.lcshFederal aid to early childhood educationeng
dc.subject.lcshFederal aid to day care centerseng
dc.subject.lcshRural children -- Careeng
dc.subject.lcshCity children -- Careeng
dc.titleTeacher Education and Benefits in Subsidized Child Care Programseng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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