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dc.date.issued2002eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionNo date specified on publication.eng
dc.description.abstractWhen studying early childhood programs, it is important to look at two areas of workforce statistics: job retention rates and compensation data (salary and benefits). Across the nation, the early childhood field experiences an annual turnover rate of 30%, which is quite high when compared to the 6.6% annual turnover rate among public school teachers.3 In Missouri, the MCCRC data indicate approximately 33% of the early childhood educators anticipate leaving the field within the next five years.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by HHS Child Care Bureau and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundationeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2287
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherCenter for Family Policy & Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Center for Family Policy and Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPolicy Brief (Center for Family Policy & Research)eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.source.urihttp://cfpr.missouri.edu/Retention7_26_08.pdfeng
dc.subjectteacher retention ; education ; turnovereng
dc.subject.lcshDay care centers -- Employeeseng
dc.subject.lcshPreschool teacherseng
dc.subject.lcshEmployee retentioneng
dc.subject.lcshEarly childhood educatorseng
dc.subject.lcshTeacher turnovereng
dc.titleEarly Childhood Workforce Retention Rates: What factors impact the statistics?eng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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