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dc.contributor.authorRantz, Marilyn J.eng
dc.contributor.authorMarek, Karen Dormaneng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2008-04eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description.abstractThe oldest members of the Baby Boom generation born between 1946 and 1964 will turn sixty-five in 2011. As the size of our senior population increases over the next few decades, so will their health care needs. In the early decades of this century, the proportion of elderly citizens in our total population is expected to steadily rise from the present level of approximately 12 percent to an estimated peak of 20 percent in 2030. The needs are great. Researchers, health care professionals, and interested citizens must find ways to care for the growing senior population in ways that meet the elders' needs and insure the quality of the nursing care received.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2364
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherCenter for Family Policy & Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Center for Family Policy and Researcheng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPolicy Brief (Center for Family Policy & Research)eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.source.urihttp://mucenter.missouri.edu/longtermcare.pdfeng
dc.subjectelderly ; health care ; agingeng
dc.subject.lcshOlder people -- Home careeng
dc.subject.lcshOlder people -- Services foreng
dc.subject.lcshOlder people -- Housingeng
dc.subject.lcshGeriatric nursingeng
dc.subject.lcshLong-term care of the sickeng
dc.titleInsuring Quality Long-Term Nursing Careeng
dc.typeDocumenteng


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