Interannual Variability of Snowfall Events Southwest Missouri and Snowfall to- Liquid Water Equivalents at the Springfield WFO

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Interannual Variability of Snowfall Events Southwest Missouri and Snowfall to- Liquid Water Equivalents at the Springfield WFO

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/2462

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Title: Interannual Variability of Snowfall Events Southwest Missouri and Snowfall to- Liquid Water Equivalents at the Springfield WFO
Author: Lupo, Anthony R., 1966-; Albert, Andrew; Hearst, Ronald; Market, Patrick S.; Akyuz, F. Adnan; Allmeyer, Cyndi L.
Contributor: University of Missouri-Columbia. College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (CAFNR). School of Natural Resources. Department of Soil, Environmental and Atmospheric Sciences.
Keywords: weather forecasting
snowfall patterns
Date: 2005-12
Publisher: National Weather Association
Citation: National Weather Digest December 2005, 29, 13-24.
Abstract: In order to address the difficult issue of forecasting snowfall amounts for the general public, forecasters must be intimately familiar with the climatological behavior of snowfall events, and associated snowfall-to-liquid precipitation (SL) ratios that accompany events impacting the region. In Southwest Missouri, an average of 4 to 5 snowfall events of 3 inches or more occurred every year within the period of 1949 to 2002. These events were associated with an average SL ratio of about 12 inches of snow to one inch of rain (12:1). Past studies have also demonstrated relationships between the synoptic environment and SL ratios for a particular locale. Indeed, while many atmospheric and environmental factors contribute to the observed SL ratios in a particular event, quite often, recurring synoptic patterns are typically associated with similar SL ratios in Southwest Missouri. This study identified four synoptic patterns that bring heavy snowfalls to Southwest Missouri and these are associated predominantly with certain SL ratios. In Southwest Missouri, synoptic disturbances classified as southwest lows or deepening lows, processed large amounts of moisture and produced heavy snow. Sixty-seven percent of these events produced SL ratios of 12:1 or less, and 90% produced SL ratios of 14:1 or less. Snowfall events (progressive troughs and northwest lows) which brought less snowfall were typically associated with higher SL ratios. There was no significant El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) related difference in the number of snowfalls per winter season. When the study period was stratified to include interdecadal variability, changes in ENSO- related variability did emerge. Additionally, the SL ratios were smaller during El Niño years and there has been no trend in this tendency.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/2462
ISSN: 0271-1052

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