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dc.contributor.authorDanis, Peter G.en
dc.date.issued2001-08eng
dc.description.abstractNo evidence was identified that provides a basis for determining whether EGD leads to improved outcomes in patients with GERD. However, patients with GERD referred for elective EGD who were found to have Barrett's esophagus were more likely to have symptoms for more than 1 year than patients who did not have Barrett's esophagus. Patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma were more likely to have frequent, severe, or longer duration of GERD symptoms. The calculated odds ratios (OR) for esophageal adenocarcinoma increased with increasing frequency, severity, or duration of GERD symptoms, independently or in combination.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2830en
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networken
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2001 (MU)en
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Network
dc.subjectBarrett's esophagusen
dc.subjectesophageal adenocarcinomaen
dc.subjectchronic therapyen
dc.subject.lcshAdenocarcinomaen
dc.subject.lcshGastroesophageal refluxen
dc.subject.lcshEsophagus -- Precancerous conditionsen
dc.subject.meshBarrett Esophagusen
dc.titleWhich patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) should have esophagogastroduoudenoscopy (EGD)?en
dc.typeArticleen


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