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dc.contributor.authorStephens, Mark B.eng
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, E. Dianeeng
dc.date.issued2002eng
dc.description.abstractTwenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has a higher correlation with target end-organ damage than standard office measurements and is superior for risk stratification. Because it is more complicated to implement than office-based measurements, it should be reserved for: establishing the diagnosis of white-coat hypertension or borderline hypertension in previously untreated patients; evaluating previously treated patients with resistant hypertension; diagnosing and treating hypertension disorders of pregnancy; and identifying nocturnal hypertension. (Grade of recommendation: B, based on consistent cohort studies and trials, requiring extrapolation in certain clinical circumstances)eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2844eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2002 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 51, no. 01 (January 2002): 15.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectend-organ damageeng
dc.subjectnocturnal hypertensioneng
dc.subjectwhite-coat hypertensioneng
dc.subject.lcshAmbulatory blood pressure monitoringeng
dc.subject.lcshBlood pressure -- Measurementeng
dc.subject.lcshHypertensioneng
dc.subject.lcshHypertension in pregnancyeng
dc.titleDoes ambulatory blood pressure monitoring aid in the management of patients with hypertension?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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