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dc.contributor.authorFleming, David A.eng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Health Management and Informatics. Center for Health Ethicseng
dc.date.issued2006-10eng
dc.descriptionEssayeng
dc.description.abstractIn Texas Legislators are having second thoughts about a controversial futile care law that allows hospitals to unilaterally terminate life support in patients with end stage illness. Under the terms of the state's "futile-care law," if a hospital review committee feels that further treatment of a patient is futile they can ultimately withdraw treatment after giving a patient's family 10 days to find another facility who will accept them. If no accepting hospital can be found the treating hospital can then end treatment, even if the family objects. As a result several high-profile cases have turned Texas into a right to life battleground.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2850eng
dc.publisherCenter for Health Ethicseng
dc.relation.ispartofCenter for Health Ethics publicationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Health Management and Informatics. Center for Health Ethicseng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEthical Issues Series;Oct. 2006eng
dc.subject.lcshRight to lifeeng
dc.subject.lcshCare of the sick -- Law and legislationeng
dc.titleEthical Issues: Futility Policies and Politicseng
dc.typeOthereng


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