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dc.contributor.authorAndy, Camilleeng
dc.contributor.authorThering, Anneng
dc.date.issued2002eng
dc.description.abstractFor treating seasonal allergic rhinitis, inhaled nasal corticosteroids are superior to nonsedating antihistamines (Grade of recommendation: A, based on a large meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). Combining nasal steroids and nonsedating antihistamines yields no additional benefits (Grade of recommendation: A, based on several RCTs). Unless patient preference limits their use, nasal steroids should be first-line therapy.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2851eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2002 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 51, no. 07 (July 2002): 616.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectcorticosteroidseng
dc.subjectfirst-line therapyeng
dc.subjectallergieseng
dc.subject.lcshAdrenocortical hormoneseng
dc.subject.lcshAllergy -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshRhinitis -- Treatmenteng
dc.titleHow effective are nasal steroids combined with nonsedating antihistamines for seasonal allergic rhinitis?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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