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dc.contributor.authorDudley, Timothyeng
dc.contributor.authorNashelsky, Joaneng
dc.date.issued2002eng
dc.description.abstractReducing environmental tobacco smoke exposure decreases health care utilization among poor asthmatic children. Dust mite reduction by chemical measures is potentially harmful. (Grade of recommendations: B, based on single randomized controlled trial.) Evidence is insufficient for or against dust mite reduction by physical means, use of synthetic or feather bedding, removal of cats, use of air filters or reducing indoor humidity. (Grade of recommendations: D, inconsistent studies.)eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2866eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2002 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 51, no. 07 (July 2002): 618.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectchemical measureseng
dc.subjecttobacco smokeeng
dc.subjectacute asthmaeng
dc.subjectdust miteeng
dc.subject.lcshPediatric respiratory diseaseseng
dc.subject.lcshAsthma -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshAsthma in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshIndoor air pollutioneng
dc.subject.lcshAllergy -- Immunotherapyeng
dc.titleWhat environmental modifications improve pediatric asthma?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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