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dc.contributor.authorFleming, David A.eng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Health Management and Informatics. Center for Health Ethicseng
dc.date.issued2006-03eng
dc.descriptionEssayeng
dc.description.abstractFor elderly patients, especially those in long term facilities, the risk of death is obviously high. The challenge, therefore, as health care providers is knowing when to employ our healing powers to enable a “good death” when it is clear that further aggressive intervention is medically futile, will be overly burdensome, or will not reasonably offer benefit to the patient.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2874eng
dc.publisherCenter for Health Ethicseng
dc.relation.ispartofCenter for Health Ethics publicationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Health Management and Informatics. Center for Health Ethicseng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEthical Issues Series;March 2006eng
dc.subjecttreatment vs. care of dying patientseng
dc.subjectpneumonia and the elderlyeng
dc.subject.lcshPalliative treatmenteng
dc.titleEthical Issues: A Good Deatheng
dc.typeOthereng


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