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dc.contributor.authorFleming, David A.eng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Health Management and Informatics. Center for Health Ethicseng
dc.date.issued2005-09eng
dc.descriptionEssayeng
dc.description.abstractMedical ethics is grounded by the notion that we must always respect the patient's right of self determination, which means that we should inform patients about what needs to be done and seek permission before doing it to them. But, what about those situations when consent is unobtainable, or when the patient wants something done that may be unnecessary or unreasonably harmful to them or to others? The tenets of medicine inform us that if action is needed but consent cannot be obtained, such as in an emergency, there is a presumption that the patient or victim would want us to treat them as long as the intervention is rational and not unduly risky.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2886eng
dc.publisherCenter for Health Ethicseng
dc.relation.ispartofCenter for Health Ethics publicationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Health Management and Informatics. Center for Health Ethicseng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEthical Issues Series;Sep. 2005eng
dc.subject.lcshInformed consent (Medical law)eng
dc.subject.lcshPatient refusal of treatmenteng
dc.titleEthical Issues: Treating Patients Without Permissioneng
dc.typeOthereng


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