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dc.contributor.authorAitken, Paul V., Jr.eng
dc.contributor.authorFlake, Donnaeng
dc.date.issued2003-07eng
dc.description.abstractThe risk of rupture of a small cerebral aneurysm (<10 mm) is very low in asymptomatic patients who have never had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Because the risk of morbidity and mortality from surgical intervention significantly exceeds that of nonsurgical monitoring for this group, primary care physicians do not need to refer patients with this condition to a neurosurgeon for clipping (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, based on cohort and case-control studies). For patients managed conservatively, annual office follow-up and imaging evaluation should be considered, and is necessary if a specific symptom should arise (SOR: C, based on expert opinion).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 52(7) 2003: 560+.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/2946eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2003 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectsurgical interventioneng
dc.subjectmorbidityeng
dc.subject.lcshNervous system -- Surgeryeng
dc.subject.lcshSubarachnoid Hemorrhageeng
dc.subject.lcshIntracranial Aneurysms Rupture -- Surgeryeng
dc.subject.lcshIntracranial Aneurysmseng
dc.subject.lcshCerebrovascular disease -- Surgeryeng
dc.titleIs neurosurgery referral warranted for small brain aneurysms?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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