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dc.contributor.authorAlston, Julian M.eng
dc.contributor.authorHyde, Jeffreyeng
dc.contributor.authorMarra, Michele C.eng
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Paul D. (Paul David)eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2002eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description.abstractIf a new corn rootworm resistant transgenic corn technology had been adopted on all of the United States acres treated for corn rootworm in the year 2000, the total benefits in that year alone would have been $460 million: $171 million to the technology developer and seed companies, $231 million to farmers from yield gains, and a further $58 million to farmers as nonpecuniary benefits associated with reduced use of insecticides. Our nationwide survey of corn producers suggests that initial adoption might be as low as 30%, implying first-year benefits of about $138 million.eng
dc.description.sponsorship"The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the NSF Center for Integrated Pest Management and the Illinois Council on Food and Agricultural Research (C-FAR) through a Sentinel grant."eng
dc.identifier.citationAgBioForum, 5(3) 2002: 71-84.eng
dc.identifier.issn1522-936Xeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/299eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherAgBioForumeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionAgBioForum, vol. 5, no. 3 (2002)eng
dc.source.urihttp://www.agbioforum.missouri.edu/v5n3/v5n3a01-alston.htmeng
dc.subjectcorn rootworm ; economic benefits ; nonpecuniary benefitseng
dc.subject.lcshCorn -- Genetic engineering -- Economic aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshWestern corn rootworm -- Economic aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshNorthern corn rootworm -- Economic aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshFarmers -- Attitudeseng
dc.titleAn Ex Ante Analysis of the Benefits from the Adoption of Corn Rootworm Resistant Transgenic Corn Technologyeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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