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dc.contributor.authorBuescher, Jennifer J.eng
dc.contributor.authorMeadows, Susan E.eng
dc.date.issued2004eng
dc.description.abstractCombining nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen for short courses provides more relief of pain in osteoarthritis without an increase in side effects (strength of recommendation [SOR]=B). Combining acetaminophen at 4 g/d with an NSAID can also decrease the daily dose of NSAID required for pain relief, thus reducing the potential risk from higher-dose NSAID therapy (SOR=B). Over the long term, however, this combination may increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding more than that conferred by the NSAID alone (SOR=B). If combination therapy is necessary, limiting the dose of acetaminophen to ≤2 g/d minimizes gastrointestinal toxicity. Acetaminophen alone at the lowest dose to provide pain relief is the safest pharmacologic choice for patients with osteoarthritis.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3032eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2004 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 53, no. 06 (June 2004): 501-503.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectpain reliefeng
dc.subjectupper gastrointestinal (GI) bleedingeng
dc.subjectcombination therapyeng
dc.subject.lcshNonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agentseng
dc.subject.lcshOsteoarthritiseng
dc.titleDo acetaminophen and an NSAID combined relieve osteoarthritis pain better than either alone?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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