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dc.contributor.authorNordone, Danielle S.eng
dc.contributor.authorWesterberg, Dyanneeng
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Diane G.eng
dc.date.issued2004-05eng
dc.description.abstractNo randomized clinical trials or prospective studies have demonstrated adequate evidence to screen individuals for diabetes mellitus. A recently published meta-analysis for the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) stated that "until we have better evidence about its benefits, harms, and costs, the role of screening as a strategy to reduce the burden of suffering of diabetes will remain uncertain"� (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, based on inconclusive studies). The group of patients most likely to benefit from diabetes screening are patients with hypertension (SOR: B), or those whose risk for coronary heart disease is such that a diagnosis of diabetes would mandate addition of aspirin or lipid-lowering agents (SOR: C).eng
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Practice, 53(5) 2004: 401-403.eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3053eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Inquiries, 2004 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectasymptomatic stateeng
dc.subjectglycemic controleng
dc.subject.lcshDiabetes -- Diagnosiseng
dc.subject.lcshCoronary heart diseaseeng
dc.subject.lcshGlycemic indexeng
dc.subject.lcshHypertensioneng
dc.titleDoes screening for diabetes in at-risk patients improve long-term outcomes?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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