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dc.contributor.authorCrownover, Brian K.eng
dc.contributor.authorJamieson, Barbaraeng
dc.date.issued2004eng
dc.description.abstractFor urticarial itch, first- and second-generation antihistamines have similar clinical benefit and are superior to placebo (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, systematic review of randomized trials [RCT]). For itch related to atopic dermatitis, antihistamines are no better than placebo (SOR: B, small RCTs and other studies). Other categories of pruritus are best treated with non-antihistamine agents (SOR: C, based on expert opinion and disease-oriented research).eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/3069eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherFamily Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionClinical Inquiries, 2004 (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. School of Medicine. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Family Physicians Inquiries Networkeng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of family practice, 53, no. 09 (September 2004): 742-744.eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectnocturnal sedationeng
dc.subjecturticarial itcheng
dc.subject.lcshSkin -- Diseases -- Treatmenteng
dc.subject.lcshAntihistamineseng
dc.subject.lcshItchingeng
dc.subject.lcshAtopic dermatitiseng
dc.titleFirst- or second-generation antihistamines: which are more effective at controlling pruritus?eng
dc.typeArticleeng


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