[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorHutchinson, Sandra L. (Sandra Lynn), 1956-eng
dc.contributor.authorOrscheln, Pauleng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 4, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Sandy Hutchinsoneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionEd. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational leadership and policy analysis.eng
dc.description"December, 2012"eng
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if noncognitive variables, alone or in combination with standardized test score (ACT or SAT) and/or high school grade point average, can predict student success (first-semester grade point average, first to second year retention and five year graduation rate) for 154 academically at-risk college freshmen admitted into the Conditional Admissions Program (CAP) at the University of Central Missouri for the Fall 2007 semester. In this investigation, student success was defined as a first semester GPA of 2.0 or higher, retaining to the second year and graduating within a five year time frame. Through the six- question short answer-style Insight Resume´, noncognitive attributes were evaluated based on each student's life experiences and what they learned from those experiences. Correlations were calculated measuring the relationship between the Insight Resume´ and the dependent variables. Findings revealed there were only slight correlations between Insight Resume´ score and earning a first semester GPA of 2.0 or greater, retaining from the first to the second year, and graduating in five years. In addition, logistic regression was used to measure the predictive value of the combination of the Insight Resume´ scores, HSGPA and composite ACT scores on predicting first semester GPA of 2.0 or higher, retention from year one to year two, or five year graduation rate. Results indicated that there was no indication any of the predictor variables significantly improved the ability to predict earning a first semester GPA of 2.0 or higher or whether a student would retain or graduate.eng
dc.format.extentvi, 85 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872567489eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/33096
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.subjectstudent successeng
dc.subjectstandardized testingeng
dc.subjectnoncognitive attributeseng
dc.subjectpredictor variableseng
dc.titleUsing noncognitive assessment to predict academic success for at-risk studentseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysis (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record