[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCallahan, Richard J., 1967-eng
dc.contributor.authorButler, Josephineeng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 6, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Richard Callahaneng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.description"December 2012."eng
dc.description.abstractMulticulturalism and diversity are terms we hear about often in the United States. For many years now, the discourse about embracing multiculturalism and racial diversity has been a fact of life in the United States. The last couple of decades have brought religious diversity to the forefront of the discussion about multiculturalism. Religious diversity has gained attention in the mainstream media, especially since the September 11th attacks and events that have occurred afterwards. It is troublesome to note, as a recent report published by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life demonstrates, that Americans are ignorant about various world religions. The lack of knowledge about world religions is incredibly disheartening when human services professionals are concerned, such as social workers. Social workers work with clients who differ in racial, socioeconomic, and religious diversity. The fact that the general public does not know much about different religions is troublesome because social workers in general do not take separate Religious Studies classes during their graduate programs. I argue that the academic discipline of Religious Studies provides useful theories social workers can use in their professional work with religiously diverse clients. Robert Orsi and Thomas Tweed, well-known Religious Studies scholars, have dynamic theories about the role religion plays in people's lives that could improve social workers' effectiveness in working with religiously diverse clients.eng
dc.format.extentiii, 63 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/33128
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjectreligious diversityeng
dc.subjecthuman services professionalseng
dc.subjectreligious studies educationeng
dc.titleReligious literacy in the social work professioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record