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dc.contributor.advisorBarrow, Lloyd H.eng
dc.contributor.authorMerle-Johnson, Dominikeeng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 11, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Dr. Lloyd H. Barroweng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionPh. D. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Curriculum and instruction.eng
dc.description"December, 2012"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Undergraduate students' understanding of geology concepts and related connections are necessary to develop scientific knowledge. However, there is very limited research of college students understanding about volcanoes and the role of teaching strategies in contributing to students' understanding of volcanology concepts. In this primarily qualitative study, open-ended responses from a pre/post-test, students' confidence levels, semi-structured individual interviews, course assessments, and field notes were sources of data. Of the 184 students from two introductory geology courses that answered the pre-test, 10 students were randomly selected for interviews. Students clarified their pre-test answers during the interview, and mentioned the teaching strategies that facilitated their understanding about volcanoes and igneous rocks. Using an inductive approach, student data was analyzed as individual cases, then as cross-cases. Four concept categories emerged, where students were categorized as high, partial and weak understanding about volcanoes. Prior to instruction, students' conceptual knowledge of volcanoes and connections among volcanology concepts was limited, mostly on volcanic processes and products. All students increased conceptual knowledge and related connections about volcanoes, but medium-score students were weak in explaining volcanic processes. Students' misconceptions about volcanoes were identified. Visualizations and laboratory activities were the two teaching strategies that helped students in the systematic building of volcano concepts and connections.eng
dc.format.extentxvii, 242 pageseng
dc.identifier.oclc872569521eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/33186
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/33186eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectscientific knowledgeeng
dc.subjectteaching strategieseng
dc.subjectvolcanic processeseng
dc.subjectundergraduate studentseng
dc.titleInvestigating undergraduate students' sense making and connections about volcanology conceptseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and instruction (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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