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dc.contributor.advisorBaum, Robert Martineng
dc.contributor.authorGoshadze, Mariameng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 18, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Robert Baumeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Religious studies.eng
dc.description"December, 2012"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Witchcraft has been extensively dismissed or simplified in popular thought, media and scholarship as a negative force that aggravates social hostilities and hinders peaceful cooperation between social groups. Even though the relevance of witchcraft in modern African societies is largely acknowledged today, many interpretations of the phenomenon are still grounded in "Western" thought. This thesis counters the negative perception of witchcrafts described above and explores it as an alternative form of self-expression in societies that are community oriented. The focus of the work is witchcraft beliefs among the Akan of Ghana, the biggest cultural and ethnic category in the country. Playing with psychological aspects of witchcraft beliefs, this research presents witchcraft among the Akan as a way for close-knit communities to regulate and personify their anti-social elements. In this context, witchcraft beliefs provide a vent for anxieties when communal responsibilities and etiquette place heavy obligations upon the members. They serve as an outlet for subconscious sentiments in societies where other means of conflict resolution are either unavailable or shunned. Since direct confrontation is not an option, anxieties and sharp emotional experiences are internalized, which in turn translates into witchcraft accusations. Unlike many functionalist theories, the psycho-functional view presented here avoids demystification of witchcraft through the Western lens, while at the same time normalizing it for outside observers.eng
dc.format.extentiii, 90 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/33239
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectwitchcrafteng
dc.subjectcommunity oriented societyeng
dc.subjectanti-social elementseng
dc.subjectconflict resolutioneng
dc.titleThe role of witchcraft accusations as an alternative form of self-expressioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineReligious studies (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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