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dc.contributor.advisorKoditschek, Theodoreeng
dc.contributor.authorHaden, Margareteng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on March 18, 2013).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dr. Theodore Koditschekeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionM.A. University of Missouri--Columbia 2012.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History.eng
dc.description"December 2012"eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Helena Blavatsky, the enigmatic co-founder of the Theosophical Society, has an extensive biographical record, much of which is dedicated to proving or disparaging the authenticity of her works and supposed powers. The object of this paper is to instead explore the various influences of Theosophy as she presented them to her British audience, specifically while she lived in London from 1887 until her death in 1891, and how aspects of her personal and Theosophical syncretism related to wider cultural issues facing fin de siècle Britons. Blavatsky, as part of a wider occult revival, attempted to confront the problems facing modern Britons by combining scientific, spiritual and otherworldly discourses. She also syncretized East and West in her Theosophical works, and described herself as “half Asiatic.” Blavatsky had a similarly syncretic gender identity, and regularly combined women's equality with the greater cause of Universal Brotherhood. Her critics and supporters also utilized various aspects of her personal and intellectual syncretism. Overall, Blavatsky's works intended for a general audience presented her syncretism as very relevant to the average Briton. The main primary sources considered here are the published works Blavatsky intended for popular readership, especially the 45 issues of the Theosophical magazine Lucifer which she edited and provided content for while in London, as well as works on Blavatsky by her contemporaries. The paper also draws from and builds upon recent secondary sources, including Theosophical publications, popular biographies, and academic monographs.eng
dc.format.extentiii, 123 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/33240
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectTheosophyeng
dc.subjectoccult revivaleng
dc.subjectintellectual syncretismeng
dc.title"The sphinx of the nineteenth century": Helena Blavatsky's syncretism in Britain, 1887-1891eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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